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Abigail and Stargazer Lottie featured in Upworthy.com

Abigail and Stargazer Lottie are making a lot of headlines lately. This time, they were featured in an article by Maz Ali in the Upworthy.com website, talking about Lottie, Abigail and her dreams, and the necessity of having young girls become interested in STEM.

See the toy designed by a 6-year-old that was launched into history!

Did you know you can create a tiny rocket using vinegar and baking soda?

If you didn't learn that in elementary school science class, take it from Abigail, a 6-year-old space geek with all the makings of a soon-to-be-great scientist.

Abigail has a contagious fascination with all things science, but she has a particular passion for astronomy.

"Sometimes I look up and think ... could I somehow see what's up there?" she wondered in an interview with filmmaker Elena Rossini.

She was really cracking me up at this part.

Still, like most kids, she loves toys — especially ones that reflect her own curiosity and sense of adventure.

When she and her mom spotted Lottie Dolls (pictured above) in a local toy store, they were both really excited. They were perfect for a little doer like Abigail.

"The line is more focused on what the doll can do [and] take part in, rather than the way it looks," said Abigail's mom, Zoe.

They were so happy with the toys that Zoe wanted to thank the company, so she sent an email into the digital abyss. Lottie Dolls not only responded to the email, but co-founder Lucy Follett even reached out to learn more about Abigail.

As the company got to know the little astro girl, they were inspired to create a new "Stargazer" Lottie Doll, and Abigail got to design it.

Toys like Lottie Dolls do for kids what parents want: encourage them to learn and be who they are — kids.

"Stargazer comes with the planets, which every child loves to put in order. It's like a little puzzle," said Zoe. "And she's wearing clothing that a child would wear to go outside and look at the stars as well, so she's a natural companion."

 

Rossini was contacted by Lottie Dolls to tell the story of Stargazer after tweeting some praise for the company's amazing products.

 

This story isn't just about one little girl. It's about an entire generation of girls.

A U.S. Department of Education study found that female high school graduates are less likely to "like" science and mathematics.

And women who graduate from college are even less likely to enter STEM careers than men — even those who finish with STEM degrees.

Chart by the U.S. Department of Commerce.

The U.S. Department of Commerce notes several reasons for this gender divide:

"There are many possible factors contributing to the discrepancy of women and men in STEM jobs, including: a lack of female role models, gender stereotyping, and less family-friendly flexibility in the STEM fields. Regardless of the causes, the findings of this report provide evidence of a need to encourage and support women in STEM. "

Lottie Dolls' founders know how crucial it is to get more girls stoked for science. So they came up with a brilliant way to launch the product.

In a collaboration with the European Space Agency, Lottie Dolls sent Stargazer to space. Yes, outer bleep-bloopin' space.

On Dec. 6, Abigail's doll joined British astronaut Tim Peake on a ride to the International Space Station, becoming the first doll in Earth's orbit.

 

 

Now that's what I call a product launch.

Watch Elena Rossini's short film for Lottie Dolls:

 

 


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